Baby  sleeping on a high chair

flickr.com/griffhome

It’s 2:00 am, and something’s woken you.  It sounds like a colony of bullfrogs, or perhaps a marching band.  But then, you realize that people are snoring — in every room in your own house.

It’s bad enough that your husband snores like a wild man, but now you recognize that your child is snoring as well!  Out of curiosity, you mention the problem to your pediatrician, who tells you that children who snore should be checked for possible underlying concerns.

Is snoring usually genetic?  Actually, if one parent is a snorer, the kid is three times more likely to also Read more . . .

Infant with reddish nose  lying on a crib

flickr.com/futurestreet

The woman who divorced her noisy husband told her friends that she was allergic to his snoring.   However, what she didn’t realize is that his snoring was due to allergies.

The trumpeting noise associated with snoring is generated by airflow trying to push its way through an blocked airway. While snoring is not an illness,  it can be symptomatic of other health problems,  even an allergic reaction.

Allergic rhinitis is a health condition in which the membrane lining the nose and throat become inflamed. Usually, Read more . . .

Lady sleeping on the sofa

flickr.com/selmer

If incessant snoring constantly suppresses your dreams of silent nights,  there are several facts that you need to know.

Snoring affects persons of all ages,  all over the world.  In the United States alone, there are an estimated 40 million snorers.  In the United Kingdom, the number is around 15 million, with the total climbing to over 15 million in Germany.  Across the globe,  snoring caused by nasal airway blockages, afflicts more than a billion people. Read more . . .

Monitoring gadget on left forefinger

flickr.com/besighyawn

Let’s say you have a snoring problem, and you wake most mornings to your partner’s cold shoulder.  Or, your partner snores and you can no longer stand one more thunderous night.  It’s a big problem, but treatment alternatives are available.

Sooner or later in every snorer’s life, there comes a time when the condition stops being an annoying habit, and starts being a legitimate trouble.  You, or your partner, can’t avoid the issue anymore.  Something has to be done, but what?  There are several options that can make a real difference. Read more . . .

Infant in deep sleep

flickr.com/ydog

A parent’s love of his or her child is,  hopefully,  unconditional,  so parents of children who snore will often regard their child’s habit as an adorable trait.  Childhood snoring can signify a medical problem,  so there may be nothing “cute” about it.

It is estimated that around 3% to 12% of preschool children snore.  Most of these children will otherwise  look quite healthy and fit. This kind of snoring experienced by children is called primary snoring.

Another  two percent of young children will suffer from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is being Read more . . .